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Volunteer-Awards-National

Girl Scouts of the USA Awards

Adult volunteers make Girl Scouting happen! They selflessly give their time and talents to help build girls of courage, confidence, and character. We appreciate our volunteers and believe they deserve to be recognized for their contributions. Nominate your favorite outstanding volunteer for one of these prestigious national awards. Honorees will be recognized and celebrated at the Badgerland On My Honor event June 24, 2021.

Nominations must be submitted by May 10th, 2021

View the Awards Nomination info packet

Volunteer of Excellence

This award recognizes volunteers who have contributed outstanding service while partnering directly with girls to implement the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE) through use of the National Program Portfolio (Journeys and/or Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting) OR who have worked behind the scenes and contributed outstanding service in support of the council’s mission delivery to girl and adult members.

Recipient Criteria:
The candidate has performed beyond expectations for the position to deliver the GSLE to girls using the National Program Portfolio. OR The candidate’s performance has been beyond the expectations of the position and has supported council’s mission-delivery goals in one or more of the following functional areas: Membership Development/Community Cultivation, Volunteer Relations and Support, Program, Leadership and Governance, Fund Development, or Council Support Service (such as IT, Customer Service, Merchandising).

Examples of a Candidate:

  • A troop leader has grown her troop by actively recruiting to bring more girls into Girl Scouts. She works with her troop to complete a Journey, and their Take Action project in their community brings awareness of the positive impact of the Girl Scout organization.
  • A volunteer Program Advisor works over the course of the year with a teen advisory committee of 30 current Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors who plan and deliver four performance day camps, using content from the aMuse journey.
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Appreciation Pin

The Appreciation Pin recognizes an individual’s exemplary service in support of delivering the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. This service, which has had a measurable impact on one geographic area of service, helps reaches and surpasses the mission-delivery goals of the area.

Recipient Criteria:
The service performed by the candidate is above and beyond the expectations for the position held, and made an impact on one geographic area, such as a Service Unit or community, within the council’s jurisdiction.

Examples of a Candidate:

  • At an event, a Troop Leader noticed the diversity of the girls did not match the diversity of the community. She talked with her council staff and found they had identified a potential for membership increase among the Hispanic communities in her area. She collaborated with local leaders to create and implement recruitment strategies to reach both girls and adults and new ways to support new members. As a result, Hispanic girl membership rose by 14 percent and adult membership by 15 percent last year.
  • A local volunteer hears feedback from girls that they do not know any of the other Girl Scouts in their community. She works to plan three events in her community for girls to meet their fellow Girl Scouts sisters and to provide local programming opportunities that the girls would not otherwise have.
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Honor Pin

The Honor Pin recognizes an individual’s exemplary service in support of delivering the Girl Scout Leadership Experience, which has had a measurable impact on two or more geographic areas of service, allowing the council to reach and surpass its mission-delivery goals.

Recipient Criteria:
The service performed by the candidate is above and beyond the expectations for the position held and made an impact on two or more geographic areas, such as multiple Service Unit or communities, within the council jurisdiction.

Examples of a Candidate:

  • A volunteer facilitator realized that although the council created online courses and resources on the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE), at leader meetings she heard comments indicating that many volunteers were still unsure on how to deliver the GSLE to girls when working with Journeys. She worked with the training department to develop a resource, which would support all troop leaders as they implemented what they learned in the course. This resource was turned into a training opportunity and was piloted in four Membership Areas where, after the first year, Journey sales increased by 30 percent and the volunteer-satisfactions scores increased by 12 percent.
  • A Troop Leader Mentor overheard new leaders discussing the Volunteer Toolkit (VTK) and wondering how they could implement it in their troops. She connected with mentors in other communities to train them on VTK and to put together a team of VTK experts that would meet with leaders, before a troop meeting, to show them how to implement VTK successfully within their troop. She made follow-up connections to ensure the success of the training and support these leaders had received.
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Thanks Badge

The Thanks Badge honors an individual whose ongoing commitment, leadership and service have had an exceptional, measurable impact on meeting the mission-delivery goals and priorities of the entire council or the entire Girl Scout Movement.

Recipient Criteria:
The outstanding service performed by the candidate resulted in outcomes that benefitted the total council or the entire Girl Scout organization and is so significantly above and beyond the call of duty that no other award would be appropriate.

Examples of a Candidate:
A volunteer saw an opportunity to use Journeys to increase membership in one of the council’s target markets through the camp pathway. She helped the council partner with local companies and groups to provide in-kind, financial and volunteer support to build a Take Action treehouse at each camp. She led a task group of girls to design and develop progressive programming, based on girl-led processes and Journey content, which culminated in Take Action projects. The three-year project brought in 300 new Girl Scouts, a five percent overall increase in camp registrations the following year, 90 new volunteers, and new partnerships with 11 local organizations.

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Thanks Badge II

The Thanks Badge II honors a previous Thanks Badge award recipient who has continued to provide exemplary service in a leadership role, resulting in a measurable impact that benefits the entire Girl Scout Movement.

Recipient Criteria:
The outstanding service performed by the candidate resulted in outcomes that benefitted the entire Girl Scout organization and is so significantly above and beyond the call of duty that no other award would be appropriate, AND the candidate has received the Thanks Badge.

Examples of a Candidate:
The volunteer from the Thanks Badge example was motivated by the success of the Take Action treehouse project and submitted to present this best practice at a GSUSA conference. She then served for two years on a national task group to help educate and support all 111 other councils to create long-term plans that integrate all council departments to implement the camp pathway to grow membership and deliver the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE) through Journey use.

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President’s Award

The President’s Award recognizes the efforts of a team or committee whose exemplary service in support of delivering the Girl Scout Leadership Experience surpassed team goals and resulted in significant, measurable impact toward reaching the council’s overall goals.

Recipient Criteria:

  • All team or committee members have met all requirements and expectations of the positions held.
  • The team or committee has significantly contributed to meeting one or more of the council’s mission-delivery goals.
  • The team or committee reflects the diversity of the target audience or area it serves, in girl and adult membership, in all pathways offered.

Examples of a Candidate:
A volunteer team saw the need to better communicate information and opportunities with girls and adults in their area, so they organized a group of 15 teens and five volunteers, representing all communities in their jurisdiction, to create new communication strategies using social media (including Facebook and Twitter). As a result, 36 percent more girls attended their local events, 90 percent of open Service Unit Leadership Team positions have been filled, and they have 1,350 friends on Facebook.

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